IndyFeral – Saving the lives of cats most in need.

I have unfortunately been unable to upload the pictures that I want to include it this post due to my malfunctioning internet.  I will update the post ASAP.

 

IndyFeral was my gateway into truly becoming involved in animal rescue.  My introduction to feral cats was much like most people’s.  I kept seeing a couple cats lurking around the garbage outback, lounging in the sun on the porch and hiding in the bushes out front.  I started feeding them and realized they were not friendly to humans and likely not owned or not fixed.  A little research lead me to IndyFeral.  The next thing I knew I was not only the caretaker of what turned out to be 8 feral cats but an active volunteer with IndyFeral, having been quickly converted by the enthusiasm, devotion and empathy everyone involved exuded.

The mission of IndyFeral is simple:  IndyFeral seeks to reduce the stray and feral cat overpopulation through the non-lethal method of Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR), not trap and kill.  This mission is so important because ” In the U.S. the most comprehensive data indicates that nearly 72% of cats that enter these facilities are killed.  For feral cats, the kill rate in shelters and pounds rises to virtually 100%.” (Source)

What is Trap Neuter and Return?  TNR is a humane and non-lethal approach to feral cat population control. It is a comprehensive management plan where healthy feral (free-roaming) cats are sterilized and vaccinated, then returned to their habitat and provided with long-term care. (Definition courtesy of Alley Cat Allies.)

What is a Feral Cat?  “A Feral cat may be defined as any cat to wild or unsocialized to be kept in a typical home.  These cats are often born in the wild and avoid direct human contact.  Every feral and abandoned cat is the end result of irresponsible pet owners who failed to spay or neuter their cat then allowed it to roam freely.”  *As defined on the IndyFeral website.

This 1 minute video also explains what a feral cat is.

I would add that in my opinion these cats are the most in need of our assistance and protection as well as perhaps the most deserving because we have abandoned them and without organizations like IndyFeral there would be no one to advocate for them.

When Lisa Tudor realized that there was a great need for a TNR program in Indianapolis, IN it 2002 Indy Feral was born.  Thanks to the fantastic volunteers, some of which have been active since 2002,  that she was able to bring into the cause Indy Feral can proudly present following amazing statistics:

  • 23,194 cats fixed
  • Assistance for over 2,500 managed colonies
  • 2,717 friendly cats/kittens removed from colonies

Marion County, Indiana passed a TNR Ordinance that regulates the care of stray and feral cats with the assistance of IndyFeral who was instrumental in passing this ordinance.

IndyFeral is somewhat unique among rescue groups as you will see if you visit their website.  They share regularly updated listing of many dog, cat and wildlife rescue resources on their site and in a pdf format.  They also offer the only comprehensive listing of low cost medical care for pets in Indianapolis that I know of.  In this way they make it clear that they are a part of the solution, for all animals in need in Indianapolis, IN.  A special, unique and effective organization that deserves our support through a monetary donation, food donation (scroll to bottom of page) or by volunteering.

I hope this post will make you look at the stray cat in your yard a little differently next time he shows up.  You can help save lives and IndyFeral will help you do it.

 

Even dog people like kittens, a little.

"Let's see if you are an acceptable human."

This is Emma, the newest and at present, the youngest, Happy Critter.  I thought her tail was at attention while she was inspecting me but it pretty much stays that way all the time.

Here she is having fun with her big sister Inky.  I’ve been caring for Inky for a couple of years now.  Today was the first time she came out to meet me at the door.  Our relationship progressed from her hiding from me to meeting me at the door today.  I think she has decided she will get no attention with Emma around unless she comes on out.

KITTEN ATTACK!

Kitten attacking finger.

Kitten attacking foot.

Kitten attacking foot.

Kitten attacking hand.

Emma seems to have enjoyed our first meeting and I didn’t loose to much blood.  The best part about Emma, aside from that tail, is that she has breathed new life into her big sister Inky.

Please keep getting puppies and kittens so that I can restrain myself from adding to our furry family.

 

Cricket-Back in Sunny California

 

My review of Amy’s Happy Critters, Inc. long term “care” facility – By The Cricket

"I'm so happy to be home, I promise to be the best cat I can be from now on."

I was banished from my natural habitat of Santa Monica, California to Mooresville, Indiana from the summer of  2010 to January 2011.  Where is that you may ask?  What an excellent question.  If you google anything “Mooresville” you are directed to Mooresville, North Carolina.  I can only assume this is because North Carolina has a climate suitable for feline habitation unlike Mooresville Indiana.  Since I am a mature feline of unparalleled patience with a heart that is far to big for my own good, I allowed the caretaker who abandoned me in the back of beyond to resume her duties providing my very modest care requirements.  Also, she seems to have freed me from the arctic with no time to spare.  Apparently the weather there can actually be worse then the horrors I experienced during my incarceration.  Plus, the substitute servant added yet another dog to the house which was already overrun with pets that were not me.

"This is not California. I wonder if I'll be left behind in Kansas City, Missouri now?"

The trip back to my natural habitat was not quite as harrowing as the banishment experience as a whole.  There was a moment in transit where I feared being left behind in the dreaded Midwest again.  I was forced to wear the harness and stuffed in to a box that fits under an airplane seat.  Humiliating, not to mention uncomfortable.

About Amy and her pet “care” facility;  the bathroom was spacious but only cleaned once a day, the beds were suitable, the food was edible but the portions were paltry – I nearly starved, the view was nice once the staff placed my heated bed in the window and put an entertainment center (bird feeder) on the roof outside of my window.  As I have tried to make clear, the weather is appalling, horrible, unsuitable for felines, depressing and generally unacceptable but, I did have access to considerably more square footage then I ever have in California.  Of course I could only access the entire facility when the dogs were confined at night and I had to fight off Monkey and Domino, aka The Black Devils, most nights but a girl needs a little excitement from time to time and they are wimps.  Domino doesn’t even know how to hiss!

In short, should the small box that serves the sadistic purpose of cat transport container come into view again, I am NOT GETTING IN IT. I have no intention of leaving Santa Monica ever again, not even for more square footage.  If my substitute servant, Amy, would care to preform her duties here where the the sun shines and water does not freeze I will hire her.

"Aren't' you going to fill the food bowl? Did you loose your watch or something?"